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Getting Back into the Swing of Things and Avoiding Tendinitis

You’ve probably heard of tendons but maybe are unsure of what they do and why they are important. Tendons are the connective tissue that attaches bone to muscle. If this tissue becomes inflamed or irritated, you may have tendonitis, which can cause aching at a joint, tenderness, and mild swelling. Tennis elbow, Achilles tendinitis, and swimmer’s shoulder are examples of common tendinitis issues.

At Rheumatology and Allergy Institute of Connecticut, LLC in Manchester and Middletown, Connecticut, our team can help you if you’ve developed tendonitis. But, it’s even better to avoid the condition altogether. Read on to learn some ways you can do so.

Stretch daily and warm up before and after workouts

Tendonitis usually develops due to overuse, especially in athletes such as tennis and basketball players, runners, and middle-aged people who only engage in activities like these on the weekends. Injury often occurs when you don’t warm up properly.

Stretching the muscles around a joint can help keep you limber and prevent the irritation of the tendons. You’ll increase your range of motion, minimizing trauma on tight tissue. Stretch when you finish a workout, when your muscles still are warm.

When you warm up before you engage in your favorite workout, give attention to all your muscles with dynamic movements like bodyweight squats, hip and arm circles, and jumping jacks.

Cross-train

Running, jumping, and constantly swinging your arms (such as when pitching) puts stress on your tendons. When you have an exercise routine, take a break from high-impact activities some days and try cycling, yoga, or walking instead.

You’ll still get exercise and stretching, but without the strain and impact on your tendons. Giving them a rest from your usual activities, especially if you’re an avid high-intensity athlete, can help prevent tendonitis from setting in. 

Keep your equipment up-to-date

If your favorite running, basketball, or tennis shoes wear out and become less supportive, it can put extra stress on your heels and promote Achilles tendonitis or jumper’s knee. Replace your shoes so they have adequate heel cushioning and firm arch support to reduce stress on your tendons and keep your legs healthy.

Ease into new workouts

If you’re just starting to exercise or getting back into it after a long hiatus, ease into workouts so you don't do too much too soon. Building calf, thigh, arm, chest, and back muscles helps take the strain off your tendons.

Increase the duration and intensity of workouts over time. Easing into workouts can prevent more serious injuries for all your muscles.

Improve your form

Poor form when exercising or playing sports can set you up for problems with your tendons. Learn how to properly swing a racquet, optimal form for running, and ideal lifting techniques when in the weight room. Seek the advice of an athletic trainer, especially when starting a new activity.

Preventing tendonitis takes some effort, but it’s worth it in the long run so you can continue to enjoy an active lifestyle without daily pain. 

If you have questions, reach out to our team at Rheumatology and Allergy Institute of Connecticut, LLC. We’re here to help keep your body happy so you can do all the activities you love. Call today to schedule a consultation or book online.

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