We know this is a difficult time and We want you to know we care for our patient's health and wellbeing.

Signs Your Child May Have Kawasaki Disease

Kawasaki disease affects about 1 out of 10,000 children under the age of 5 every year in the United States and other western countries as well. Although rare, it can also occur during your adolescent and adult years.

The team at Rheumatology and Allergy Institute of Connecticut, LLC, led by board-certified physicians, Reinhard Kage, MD, PhD, and Barbara Kage, MD, FACR, provides the highest level of care for children ages six and older as well as adults. If you suspect that your child might be suffering from Kawasaki disease, we have the expertise to treat their condition.

This disease causes inflammation of your blood vessels, which is a type of vasculitis. To get the treatment necessary, you need to recognize the signs.

Symptoms of Kawasaki disease

Kawasaki disease can show up in three different phases.

Phase 1

Symptoms might include:

Phase 2

After phase one, you might see these symptoms:

Phase 3

During the third phase, signs of the disease begin to disappear. It can take up to eight weeks for your child to get their energy back.

If you notice any of these signs lasting more than three days, you should schedule an appointment with our team to avoid further complications.

The importance of understanding Kawasaki disease

Kawasaki disease can lead to bigger challenges. Even though children rarely encounter more serious issues, it can lead to heart disease if it goes untreated. Heart complications include inflamed blood vessels in the coronary arteries, inflamed heart muscles, and problems with the heart valve.

Treatment for Kawasaki disease

When you come in to see us, we evaluate your children’s condition for an accurate diagnosis to determine the right treatment. Depending on the severity of your child’s condition, we offer different treatments.

 In many cases, the disease goes away on its own. But in other cases, we might need to offer an infusion of antibodies, in addition to a dose of aspirin daily for four days. Your child’s treatment may last longer to stop a blocked artery from forming, and treatment can continue for up to eight weeks.

To avoid the severity of more serious issues with Kawasaki disease, bring your child in to see us at Rheumatology and Allergy Institute of Connecticut, LLC, for effective treatment and superior care. Contact us by calling our Manchester or Middletown locations or requesting an appointment online today.

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